Programmer Humor: How IT People See Each Other (Warning: Middle Fingers)

Programmer Humor: How IT people see each other.
We all have a lot of negative stigmas to overcome.

Though the above image is a great example of programmer humor, the very nature of human existence is a tribal one.  From time immemorial, humans have banded together in small groups for the purposes of protection, sharing of food resources, and camaraderie.

The modern workplace is a reflection of this, with a few twists.  Instead of protecting against beasts and burdens, we now protect against rogue stakeholders.  We share work resources like helpdesk professionals and software licenses instead of food.  And our camaraderie is limited in most cases to the 8-5 workday hours.

So it’s no surprise that we get content cropping up like the above image, submitted to reddit today by /u/super_good_aim_guy. It couldn’t be more accurate.

I couldn’t agree more with this matrix, especially as someone who’s worked as a Front End Developer, UX Engineer, UI Designer, Project Manager, and done some moderate System Admin work.

From a Designer perspective, which is closest to my current role as a UX Engineer, I’m not surprised that the view of Designers in general is pretty childish.  To Developers, we add seemingly random complexity without adding value.  QAs and Sysadmins tend to have a knowledge of the requirements, but lack an understanding of the “why” behind the knowledge.  Project Managers, who have a better overall view of a feature, tend to have a more favorable but practical view of our work.

So what can we do to increase our overall image and promote understanding of our design process among the other business tribes?

  • Include as many relevant people as when running through our baseline UX process.
  • Communicate our goals and and desires through whiteboarding and iterative designs involving our business partners.
  • Provide consistent, engaging designs.
  • Design with empathy for developers, QA pros, PM’s, and Sysadmins.

Taking these precautions should be a part of our everyday work, unless we want to be seen as childish monkeys.  That’s bad.

Leadership & Mentoring in the UX World

I hang out (probably more than I should) on UX Mastery’s great forums.  It’s a great way to network with different professionals in the world, and to try and help anyone who might need a hand on anything from real-world UX issues to help getting into the industry.

Today, one user in particular posed a few questions about leadership and mentoring within the UX world that I found particularly interesting.

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That got me thinking about my role in the UX universe as a whole.  Admittedly, my influence is minimal compared to the titans of the industry, but that doesn’t mean I don’t play a part in any way.  How would I answer these questions?

After a bit of thought, I decided to chime in and give the best response I could.


@HAWK is right– true leaders prefer to be acknowledged by their peers rather than self-declared. That said, I’ll do what I can to answer your questions.

1) My thoughts:

i.) The web design industry, as a whole, does not have a good understanding of the difference and value propositions focusing on both user interface and user experience. While the two are often related, they are also often confused. Muddying the waters is the fact that many professionals in our industry are asked to perform a variety of functions that, ideally, would either be performed by both a UI and a UX professional. The crossover is negating some of the gains of having two separate teams focusing on different elements of each. To get a feel for the difference and why it’s important, please feel free to check out my blog post on the subject. Educating young professionals and corporate leadership on the difference is one way I work to negate the impact of this issue.

ii.) Many professionals come to the UX industry from a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences. In truth, you don’t have to be a good technology professional to be a good UX’er– you need to have a passion for solving problems, a drive for improvement, and the ability and empathy to see things from your users’ perspectives. As a result, UX professionals come from a variety of backgrounds. Here on UX Mastery, we have architects, engineers, journalists, and a variety of other professionals.

This is both a strength of the industry, as it means we have a wide variety of valuable and interesting skill sets to draw from, but it’s also a detriment in that many look to get into the UX industry without having a common skill set. Furthermore, the skill set employers ask for is often at odds with the value of the skills of a potential employee could offer.

Defining that skill set and working to create a common conception of what basic skills a UX’er should possess before getting into different areas of the business is one of the reasons I’m here on UX Mastery. I personally had careers as a sports journalist, freelance web developer, digital sign developer, restaurant server, retail manager, call center phone jockey, and corporate trainer before I finally settled into this career. Each job taught me something valuable to my UX career, and I feel that I have a lot to offer the community at large. I’m here on UX Mastery offering my experience and thoughts in every way possible to try and lessen the impact of gaps in knowledge or experience within the community.

iii.) The wide variety of technology requiring UX focus, along with the variety of different roles a UX’er might pursue, make finding a niche difficult for many people. Simply put, there’s a lot of opportunities out there in the UX world at the moment. Different people might be more well-suited to different careers at different points in time.

As an example, I’m currently mentoring a really great young professional who’s trying to get his foot into the UX world. His background is in the financial world, where he interacts with customers and provides technical support on a daily basis. Due to his relative newness to the industry, his affinity for statistics, and his excellent people skills, I’m guiding him towards exploring a career as a UX Researcher, a career very different from a UX Designer or Engineer role.

By providing online and in-person mentoring, I’m doing what I can to help new professionals build their skills and find their niche. My hope is this will, in some small way, help to eliminate this barrier to entry for many who would be well-suited to the UX world.

2.) Being successful and being a leader are two very different things. Some of the most successful people I know are people who merely follow orders to a T, providing excellent execution of the ideas and thoughts of others. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this. I merely use it as an example of how the two aren’t necessarily correlated.

To be successful, I’d recommend anyone looking to get into the world of UX do three things– build the basic skills required of every UX professional, find a niche within the industry to focus on, and to find ways to get practical, real-world experience.

I talk a bit about the first two points in my answer to your first question, but when it comes to building real-world experience it can often be difficult to find opportunities to which you can contribute. @seyonwind, perhaps, can provide some insight into some ways to get some good experience ahead of trying to enter the industry full-time as his work ethic and diligence in volunteering for UX-related projects and causes is apparent to all who know him, online or not. My advice is to work on your own projects, to volunteer for open source projects, or offer your skills to charity (catchafire.org/ is a great place to start.)

To be a leader, it’s imperative that you seek to serve the industry in any way you can. For different people, that means different things. For me, it means hanging out in places like this and answering questions for the interested and inquisitive individuals like you. For others, it takes the shape of volunteering their services to nonprofits, blogging on the subject of UX, and providing mentoring services for young professionals.

3.) Who knows where UX growth will come from in the next 3-5 years? One of my favorite areas that hasn’t had much discussion, but will need a lot of UX attention, will be in self-driving cars and related applications. Tesla right now is leading the world in this area, but major and minor players alike will create quite a bit of competition as they enter the industry. That means more specific UX jobs for the industry.

4.) In general, corporate leadership will need the ability to better understand the value proposition of investing in user experience. At the moment, it feels like a bit of a reaction to buzzwords rather than true understanding of the UX professional and their value that’s driving the UX industry.

I hope that helps! Apologies for any typos– I’m hammering this out before a meeting and not giving it my usual once-over before I post as said meeting starts in just a minute or two. Let me know if I can clarify anything or provide any additional context :slight_smile:


What do you think the challenges that UX as a whole will face in the coming years?

Featured Article: Native Apps are Doomed

By Eric Elliott for Medium.com

From now on, I won’t be building any more native apps. All my apps going forward will be progressive web apps. Progressive web apps are web applications which are designed to work even more seamlessly on mobile devices than native mobile apps.

What do I mean by “more seamlessly?” I mean that most web traffic comes from mobile devices, and that users install between 0–3 new apps per month, on average. That means that people aren’t spending a lot of time looking for new apps to try out in the app store, but they are spending lots of time on the web, where they might discover and use your app.

Progressive web applications start out just like any other web app, but when a user returns to the app and demonstrates through usage that they’re interested in using the app more regularly, browsers will invite the user to install the app to their home screens. PWA’s can also benefit from push notifications, like native apps.

Read the full article at Medium.com

One of the Most Beautifully Designed Video Games of All Time is Getting a Sequel

I have a confession to make.  I didn’t grow up with video games.

It wasn’t until I was in my 20’s and on my own that I got my first console, a PlayStation 2 that I paid $50 for nearly 6 years after it was released.  In 2011, I bought an X-Box 360, also six years after it was released.

There are some drawbacks to being a console (and more than a half decade) behind the cutting edge of video gaming.  Avoiding spoilers for that length of time is tough, especially working in an industry where the nerdy stuff is a daily topic of conversation.

But if you can stomach not “keeping up with the Johnsons,” being six years behind is an amazing blessing.  There are hundreds of titles available for your “new” console the moment you purchase it.  All of the bugs that are fixable have been fixed.  Each last in-game feature morsel of DLC is available, with both main title and pay-to-play content often available at steep discounts.

When I picked up my X-Box 360 in December 2011, I decided to pick up the then year-and-a-half-old Red Dead Redemption at the same time.  I had been a big fan of Rockstar Games since Vice City (which, though it came out in 2002, I only managed to sink my teeth into four years after it was released).  I figured Red Dead would be the GTA in the desert.

I was wrong.  It was so much more.

To this day, Red Dead Redemption is the single most beautiful and addicting video game I’ve ever played.

Perhaps the most telling argument for the game’s intrinsic beauty and playability is the ability to get John Marston on his horse and simply ride around the map for hours, rescuing damsels in distress, hunting buffalo, dueling with Mexican bandits, and watching the amazing landscape ebb, flow, and change around him, without once completing a single mission in the main story line.

It took me years to complete the main story line, simply because most days I played, all I wanted to do was saddle up and ride.

Today Rockstar announced a sequel to this gem of the video game landscape.  Red Dead Redemption 2 is due out in October 2017, with its first trailer appearing on Thursday.

There has not ever been a video game title that’s pushed me to spend the kind of money that the “next gen” consoles demand.  Though I’m a huge NFL fan, I’ll keep updating my Madden 15 rosters and re-playing with old graphics and physics.  Ditto with FIFA 15.  I’m three titles behind in Gears of War, so GoW4 holds little interest for me.  Destiny is not my destiny.

Red Dead 2 is.

Come October 2017, I will have my next-gen console.  And if Rockstar lives up to the hype and promise that it’s shown within its capabilities, I’ll have a new favorite video game as well.

Stepping Up Your Game

I have always been a Boy Scout at heart (and, since the age of 18, an Eagle Scout in real life).  The motto of “Be Prepared” has always spoken to me.  In my day-to-day life, being prepared has been key to my success, be it church league softball, making it through the airport quickly, or advancing my UX career.

Lately, I’ve been putting a lot of effort into advancing the latter.

I get a tremendous amount of good out of establishing a daily practice of self improvement. Being relatively new to UX myself, I constantly feel like I have a lot to learn. Imposter syndrome has always been a particular bane of mine, especially when staring a new job in a new field. In a career that’s ever changing and evolving, keeping up with the fluctuating best practices and research can be challenging as well. By spending a bit of time each day working to make myself a better UX’er, I’ve found that I’ve been able to slay all of these proverbial dragons.

The big question, then, is how to go about honing your skills, especially when you’re not on a project team.

For me, there are a handful of things I do on a daily basis that I’d recommend to any UX’er looking to bump their game up a notch.

1.) Read something. There’s so much written knowledge out there about our field. I find that reading something each day is always a great first step to build my skill set. There’s quite a bit of good stuff here on UXMastery.com, User Testing Blog, UX Booth, UX Magazine, and many others. I have a Feedly feed setup that drops in all the articles from these groups so that I can pick out a couple to read every day.

2.) Interact with the Community. The UX/UI community is notorious for being welcoming. I don’t think I’ve ever met another professional group that’s more approachable, even at the higher levels. Apart from getting started here, you’ll probably want to look at ux.stackexchange.com to get a good look at what questions others are asking. On Twitter there are some excellent people to follow: my favorites are Tobias van Schneider, Daniel Burka, and Jonathan Colman.

Shameless plug time: my twitter handle is @5280_CS, if you’re at all interested. I try to retweet the articles I like best each day, and to post any unique thoughts or scenarios I come accross. It’s a great way for me to meet people in the business, and to hone my skills while doing it.

3.) Problem solve. One of the best ways to get experience in a field is to work on tackling real-life problems other people are facing. UXMastery’s forums is a great place to start, but don’t overlook ux.stackexchange.com either. Take a problem that you feel is just a little out of your comfort zone, and get to work. Approach it like you would if you were working on a UX team. Do research, whiteboard, iterate, and test.

You don’t have to post your answer to the question if you don’t feel comfortable doing so, but posting will help you get used to putting you work out there for public consumption, and defending position as well. Additionally, you can compare your approach to others to see how your outcome is different, and analyze how your process may have affected that outcome.

With such an open community, I’ve never met a UX’er with their salt who wasn’t patient when asked to describe their process or logic pretaining to their solutions.

What do you do to build your skill set on a daily basis?